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A practical guide to the proper prescription of physical activity in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

Published:September 21, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dld.2022.08.034
      Recent studies have demonstrated the potential beneficial effects of physical activity (PA) on Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). PA is any bodily energy expenditure caused by muscle activity. The World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines on PA and sedentary behaviour (2020) state that all adults (18–65 years) should undertake regular PA (strong recommendation, moderate certainty evidence). Adults should do at least 150–300 min of moderate-intensity aerobic PA or at least 75–150 min of vigorous intensity aerobic PA or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity throughout the week, for substantial health benefits (strong recommendation, moderate certainty evidence). Moreover, it is recommended to limit sedentary time and replace it with PA of any intensity (strong recommendation, moderate certainty evidence) [
      • Bull F.C.
      • Al-Ansari S.S.
      • Biddle S.
      • Borodulin K.
      • Buman M.P.
      • Cardon G.
      • Carty C.
      • Chaput J.P.
      • Chastin S.
      • Chou R.
      • Dempsey P.C.
      • DiPietro L.
      • Ekelund U.
      • Firth J.
      • Friedenreich C.M.
      • Garcia L.
      • Gichu M.
      • Jago R.
      • Katzmarzyk P.T.
      • Lambert E.
      • Leitzmann M.
      • Milton K.
      • Ortega F.B.
      • Ranasinghe C.
      • Stamatakis E.
      • Tiedemann A.
      • Troiano R.P.
      • van der Ploeg H.P.
      • Wari V.
      • Willumsen J.F
      World Health Organization 2020 guidelines on physical activity and sedentary behaviour.
      ].
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